Monday, February 15, 2016

Obscure Rock House Ruins

On our way to Sears Point  a few weeks ago, we passed by the ruins of this lonely looking old rock house. As of yet, I haven't been able to discover a single fact about this place. I guess it's just another reminder that these were tough, strong, and creative people who lived in our deserts generations ago.




Not a store, a doctor, or anything else in any direction for many miles. When I say that, I'm talking about today. Imagine how isolated it was 100 or more years ago.


A whole bunch of skill went into making this place. I know this view doesn't look like much to most people, but to them, I'm sure it was beautiful.



They built themselves a nice fire place. 



An old ruin, an abandoned wreck of an old car, or even an old rusted can. I know it's not much to some people, but to me, it is history in it's purest form. Somebody came here from somewhere else and made something out of nothing. They actually lived their lives out here on the perimeter,  What happened after that? These places fill my head with questions. 

There are people I know who are VERY reluctant to even drive across the desert today. What kind of chutzpah did it take to drop anchor and live out here in the middle of it?  


.

47 comments:

  1. Hello, a neat old house. I like the images looking thru the windows. Great find! Happy Monday, enjoy your new week!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I grew up in a suburb of Los Angeles. My dad was born in Connecticut, but left there because of the cold. He always LOVED the desert and we came out to Cathedral City often when I was a kid. Now I've lived in the desert for 45 years! WOW! Where did the time go? Yes, if only those walls could talk!
    ~Cheryl Ann~

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oh I think the view from those windows are beautiful! It shows blue sky and a vast feeling of the dessert!

    ReplyDelete
  4. did the train run through there? it looks like they collected a lot of rail ties for their corral.

    ReplyDelete
  5. That is an intriguing building. My husband and I both love old ruins. He loves to photograph them (in black and white). They inspire me with stories.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Pioneers were very brave people, I think. A special breed.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Wow! That is quite a find out there. It would be so interesting to learn more about this stone house. I'm not particularly drawn to the desert climate, but those open skies are quite beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
  8. What an amazing and fascinating old house!! It would be great to learn its history!! Terrific captures, as always, Pat!! Thanks for sharing! Have a great new week!!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Pioneers in the truest sense. I like that view, it would be cool to do a photo a day for a year there.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Such an interesting place Pat and great photos!

    ReplyDelete
  11. When I see a place like this I always wonder about the lives of those who lived and worked here. Great shots!

    ReplyDelete
  12. eileeninmd - Hi there! I agree about the windows. We really liked them also. Happy Monday (Tuesday now) to you as well.

    trav4adventures - I also have no idea about the time. You probably more than most, understand the uniqueness of the desert. It is an odd, unforgiving, and beautiful place.

    Icy BC - Me too! If you stood on the roof of this place (if there was one), you wouldn't see one single structure in any direction.

    sage - No trains in the immediate vicinity back then, but now there is.

    Elizabeth Varadan - I was also intrigued. I can understand why they inspire you.

    EG CameraGirl - Thank goodness they were like that, but I just wish they didn't feel the need to displace, kill, and marginalize the people that were already here.

    ReplyDelete
  13. robin andrea - Just like finding a gem! I'm still trying to get some more info. If I do, I'll update this post.

    Sylvia K - My pleasure Sylvia! I'm glad you appreciate this stuff.

    Wayne - They sure are! A photo a day would be cool, except during the hot months, then it would be boiling. HA!

    Brian - Thanks Brian! I appreciate that!

    Al - I do the same exact thing Al. Thanks so much!

    William Kendall - Oh yeah! I wish they would have whispered a few to me when I was there...

    ReplyDelete
  14. I too love the shots framed by the old windows I always imagine that isolated desert dwellers just want to get away from the rest of us. And I can't blame them. I imagine them as contemplative, even mystical. Maybe my imagination is running away from me to have such romantic notions. Really great to see you are back out there Pat.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I can't even imagine being that remote.

    ReplyDelete
  16. History - absolutely. Friends visiting couldn't miss it. I hope they had no enemies.

    ReplyDelete
  17. "History in its purest form." Yes. Nothing in isolated
    nature rivets my attention like an old stone house. It
    took such strength to build. It took such nerve to stand
    the loneliness. Someone fed the fire in the beautiful
    hearth and grew warm there.

    ReplyDelete
  18. A very poignant example of "My home is my castle"

    ReplyDelete
  19. Oh how I want to know their story; but oh how fun it is to imagine the people who lived here. It really did take pure courage!

    ReplyDelete
  20. I love this post and I'm with you on abandoned places and things. The history and magnetism of them is incredible.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Stickup Artist - Thanks so much! I am also very happy to be back out there. You are totally right about a lot of those folks wanting to get away. Very resourceful also. I think notions are perfect for many of those folks. Necessity was also a driver for them.

    Ms. A - I can, but it probably won't ever happen.

    ladyfi - Thanks so much! Not hard to do in places like this.

    Esther Montgomery - HA! I never thought of that. Your visitors really wouldn't have any trouble seeing the house!

    Margaret Benbow - Yep! Lot's of nerve and "sticktoitiveness." While there, I was imagining that fireplace being more than just heat.

    ReplyDelete
  22. yes, places like this really makes you wonder and want to learn the history. Nice images :)

    ReplyDelete
  23. I know its bad - but the 3rd and 4th pictures made me think of TV screens!

    Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

    ReplyDelete
  24. Oh I'm so with you on this Pat, I find situations like this absolutely fascinating. Especially as you say even these days it would be tough to impossible to live out here, how did they manage and what happened to them. I really love the way you've framed those ancient views out of what's left of the windows.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Chutzpah and brilliance. It's inspiring and mind-boggling.

    Be well, Pat.

    ReplyDelete
  26. So true,it already takes courage to live in the mountains - I can't even imagine in the desert with miles of no one around! Thanks for coming by:)

    ReplyDelete
  27. Sorry I've been MIA in commenting. Just a bit busy with life ;-). They do say that the "good old days" weren't that great. I can't imagine how some of these folks got by.

    ReplyDelete
  28. I always admire people who built their homes in the desert, tried to live their lives the best they could. That is pure survival... They were so strong and so determined. I visited many times on Antelope island (harsh Utah desert) a ranch where people also lived in desert and tried to survive.

    Pat, you had a great adventure, you took great pictures! I would be happy to see this place some day.

    Best wishes to you.

    ReplyDelete
  29. From the first far away shot looks almost like a desert citadel

    ReplyDelete
  30. Lovely photos. I especially like the 3rd picture a lot! I admire people like the desert pioneers. They simply amaze me.

    ReplyDelete
  31. What a wonderful relic of day past. I have to think of the work the went into building this house. I think that view is beautiful and I love the old fireplace. That place definitely has stories to tell.

    ReplyDelete
  32. I am completely AMAZED at the pluck, the unbelievable bravery of those willing to chuck it all in their search for their own little piece of nirvana. Weather, attacks (from humans or animals), and the never-ending pursuit of food and water. Wow. I know that I would have stayed near Philadelphia and let the West be settled by others. Not proud to say it, but there you are. A fascinating group of pictures.

    ReplyDelete
  33. It certainly would have been very lonely back then!!
    That second view out the window could almost be a landscape in a frame! I love how you have captured these.

    ReplyDelete
  34. visualnorway - Yes, it sure is. It might have been a nice castle at some time.

    Sallie (FullTime-Life) - So do I Sallie! I agree, it takes a lot of courage.

    Mandy Southgate - I totally agree! There is a huge story to be told there.

    NatureFootstep - Thanks! It really does make you wonder.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Stewart M - HA! It's not that bad Stewart. I thought the same thing at first.

    PerthDailyPhoto - Thanks Grace! I'm going to spend some more time trying to uncover some history on this place.

    Rawknrobyn - Yep! Lots and lots of chutzpah! Thanks Robyn.

    jeannettestgermain - I know what you mean. Some people really love the isolation. Coming by was my pleasure (as always).

    Bouncin Barb - Don't give it another thought Barb. I totally understand. I also can't imagine how some folks stood up to it.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Kaya - I feel the same way Kaya. It must have taken a tremendous amount of determination. Thanks Kaya! Best wishes to you as well.

    DEZMOND - HA! After I read your comment I looked at it again, you are so right. It kind of looks like some kind of fort.

    Sandy - Thanks Sandy! I admire them also. I'm pretty good out in the wilderness, but these folks were stuck there.

    genie - It sure is! I love everything about it.

    Al Penwasser - You are right! PLUCK is what they had. I could survive there, but of course, I could drive to grocery store when needed. Thanks Al...

    ReplyDelete
  37. Très belles photos !
    Lovely photos, I like much the framing of third photo.
    Fascinating story.

    ReplyDelete
  38. hi pat,

    that's an intriguing old house. i thoroughly enjoyed your photos, pat. they are all gorgeous!
    hope you have a great week ahead~

    ReplyDelete
  39. Beautiful photos, especially of the window. I love the images of ruins

    ReplyDelete
  40. VoyagesetAbstraits - Thank you very much! That window frame was a great photo, just waiting to be taken.

    Betty Manousos - Hi Betty! Thanks so much. Hope all is well with you.

    Leovi - Thanks so much Leovi! It was a great place.

    ReplyDelete
  41. I love that window frame shot. So beautiful.

    If I could get paid to just sit around, reading histories of those who had a hand in building and shaping our country, I would be in heaven. I find it so fascinating.

    ReplyDelete
  42. Baby Sister - Yep, and to think it was just sitting there waiting for me. I agree about the historical part of the story. I love that stuff.

    ReplyDelete
  43. BRILLIANT photograph of the window frame looking out (3rd photo down) because it looks like a picture hanging on the wall!

    Well done, Pat!

    ReplyDelete
  44. Ron - Thanks! When I walked in there, I thought the same thing.

    ReplyDelete

This blog is word verification free.
IS YOURS?
I love your comments and will do my best to respond to each and every one.