Monday, October 23, 2017

Twin Tanks Post #2 Wilderness Area - Joshua Tree National Park

This is the long overdue Part 2 of 3 posts relating to the greater Twin Tanks area in JTNP. If you are so inclined, here is a link to Part 1. The following photos are examples of the spectacular sights to be seen in this area. As I said in post 1, this area is very rugged, and great care should be taken while there. Even very experience hikers (such as my friend Peter) at "Spare Parts and Pics" can hurt themselves here. Right Peter? Click on the link to see Pete's sprained ankle, and other beautiful photos.

This one is posted first, for no other reason that I love it. Take a bite!

I was headed that-a-way! Except for the first 50 yards or so, it is very rugged...

 ...and looks like this. Looking back to where I started.















A happy little rock creature is slithering towards us 




A bear?

Very remote grinding slick

Nearby pestle (or mano). I couldn't find any other rocks made of this type of material in the area.

Pottery shards!

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Twin Tanks Area Post 3, will contain some petroglyphs, pictographs, and maybe even a habitation site!


77 comments:

  1. The first one looks like it is smiling. Love the bear one!

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    1. Either smiling or about to take a bite. It looks like PacMan sort of.

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  2. Some amazing rock formations. Wild what wind can do to rocks.

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    1. I agree Alex. It seems like the more I go there, the more amazed I am.

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    1. Thanks Tom. Stark is a good word for it.

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  4. Great images, Pat. The shapes and colours are very expressive.
    We visited Joshua Tree NP back in 1990 - a very long time ago! :)

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    1. Thanks Marleen! 1990 is a long time ago. I've been going there for about 60 years. Yikes!

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  5. Wonderful pictures Pat, it is amazing how many faces and animals you can see formed onto the rocks, I love this.

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    1. Thanks Jimmy! It is amazing. The more you look, the more you see. Where we are now, there is a large rock formation that looks like an eagle with it's wings spread. A long hike to get there, but I hope to see it in soon.

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  6. As you know, I enjoy seeing all kinds of rock formations... Love your bear!!!!! ha..... That's one thing I love about the Arches... See my blog post today for some interesting rock formations.

    I'd never be able to maneuver those rocks you all hiked on/around... YIPES---my ankles just aren't that sturdy --and then there's the old knees!!!!! Think I'll jus enjoy your photos.

    Hugs,
    Betsy

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    1. Hi Betsy! I will most certainly be looking at your post! I'm not as spry as I used to be out there. I compensated by slowing down a bit. Oh yeah! My knees are barking out there. Thanks for the nice words.

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  7. Magnificent shots! What a landscape... but no place to get yourself lost in.

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    1. Thanks William! Getting lost would be bad enough, getting badly injured also could be fatal.

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  8. Awesome scenery. It's a place I would like to visit some time.

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    1. It really is beautiful. I hope you do visit it some time Red. You wouldn't regret it!

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  9. It is certainly a beautiful area and you got some great photos of it.

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    1. Thanks Al! Sometimes the sky can be brutal for photos. It's always nice to see some clouds.

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  10. Thank you for taking me to a part of this beautiful country that I will never get to in person. But that I am so happy to know is there.

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    1. My Pleasure Sallie! It's kind of like the ocean. I live very close to it, and don't actually see it that often, but I love knowing it's there.

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  11. Replies
    1. I agree, and feel that way every time I see it.

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  12. Beautiful photos. What a stunning place to explore.

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    1. Thanks Robin. I could not agree more! I'll be back out there in a couple of weeks.

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  13. I enjoyed seeing all the unique boulder formations and shapes and the interesting mano and pottery shards left behind hundreds or maybe thousands of years ago?

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    1. Thanks Pat! If you look at the photo, you'll see that the ground in that area is almost completely made up of decomposed granite. That makes it very rough and abrasive. The shards were in pretty shape, despite being out in the open. Based on that, I don't think they could be more than a few hundred years old. The mano and grinding slick could be the same, or MUCH older.

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  14. Yes, Pat, a very rugged, beautiful, and remote area without a trail to follow, so easy to get turned around (and a terrible place to sprain an ankle!). Excellent photography, and nice that you sprinkled in a couple in b&w. I'm really looking forward to our next hike... a return to this area to see what else we can find.

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    1. Thanks Pete! I'm really looking forward to it also. It will be fun. Safer also, with two of us. I've been out there several times over the years, and except for around the tanks, I've never even seen another footprint out thee. Human that is...

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  15. Fantastic photographs, Pat! You're right, I especially love that first one too - great capture! And I love that it's in black and white.

    To me, what's so beautiful about what you captured in all these images is the contrast of the earthly colors of the terrain against the stunning blue sky!

    "A happy little rock creature is slithering towards us."

    Ha! It looks like the face of a manatee!

    Thanks for sharing such a beautiful area!

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    1. Hi Ron! HA! I never even thought about a manatee. Now that you said that, I see it every time. Yes, when the sky is right, the photos are really elevated. A couple of these are a bit washed out, those were taken about midday. Thanks so much for your great comments and support, for what I post here.

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  16. Hello, it is a beautiful place for hiking. The rock formations are amazing. I m glad you know how to get around there without getting lost. Looks like a pretty sky day too. Wonderful collection of photos. Enjoy your day and weekend!

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    1. Hello Eileen! Beautiful it is, but rugged. I'm more worried about getting hurt than lost, so I'm pretty careful in my old age. Thanks!

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  17. Hi Pat, such fabulous stone works, ha ha. But no, they are beautiful photos.

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    1. Thanks Bob! There are a few photos in this post that really aren't all that good.

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  18. I couldn’t look through these photos without wishing I was there. There is nothing to touch desert landscapes.

    By the way, I apologize for not visiting recently. I have to scroll down on my dashboard to reach the ‘reading list’ tab, whereas in the old days recent posts from the blogs I follow were the first thing I saw.

    Anyway, keep up the good work. Yours is the only one of the blogs I started following eight years ago that is still going!

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    1. Thanks Dennis! I will do my best.
      We do have a long history on blogger. There is only a very small group of originals following my blog also. It's kind of sad that they just disappear, and leave it all just sitting there. Even worse when one day their blog is gone. I appreciate your support and participation throughout the years Dennis.

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  19. Hi...came over because Spare Parts and Pics said I should. I'm glad I did. Love your shots.

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    1. Thanks for taking the time to stop by and comment. I appreciate it!

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  20. S0 cool! Thanks for sharing! Have a great weekend!

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    1. Thank you so much for commenting. Sharing is my pleasure.

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  21. Just finished part 1, thanks for providing the link. I am totally amazed by the huge rocks, some even resembling big creatures like the bear or that smiling one in an earlier image. Excellent photography, I like those b&w images, they are fantastic.
    Have a great weekend and I will look forward to your next venture.

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    1. My pleasure Bill. I see these rocks all the time, and I am also amazed, every time I see them. Thanks for much Bill. I hope you also have a great weekend.

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  22. It's almost unbelievable to me that those rocks were formed naturally. They look like they were sculpted. This is a fun set, Pat - all sorts of interesting creatures.

    Hope all's well and loving in your world.

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  23. Hi Pat-
    I see not just a bear, but also some elephants in those rocks.
    Very nice photos!

    I agree. This great country could use some light.
    Here is to hoping for Light.

    Have a Happy Day!
    Peace :)

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  24. Oh yes, I see animals and other creatures all over the place.
    I agree, here is to hoping for light!
    Thanks so much!

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  25. Stunning shots there Patty. Love the mix of black and white and colour. Theyre both effective. And the pottery.. how cool is that!
    I like no. 7, and the one with the three rocks and the one with the single boulder and three clouds off to the right. Great work.

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    1. Thanks so much Anthony! I think you would love this place. The town of Joshua Tree, is a haven for artists of all types. I think somebody as artistic as yourself, would find it inspirational.

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  26. What stunning geology. Amazing how the action of the wind has sculpted the rocks. really gorgeous photos. I'm happy that you are there taking the photos and I don't have to go with you to see these sights. I sort of wish I could climb on those boulders but I don't think I would last long in those conditions.
    Do you ever see snakes?

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    1. I thank you! A lot of the sculpting took place when the rock was underground also. You are right though, if you take a look at the last photo, you can see that the ground is pretty much totally made up of decomposed granite. I've been there so many times that you'd think I'd be kind of blase about it by now. I'm totally amazed every time I go there. I do see snakes occasionally, but not nearly as much as when I was a kid. That's because I don't spend nearly as much time out there during the hot months. Snakes, being cold blooded, are usually laying low during the cool months. Even when they are present, they really want nothing to do with humans, and only strike when they feel threatened. Even then they let you know by "rattling."

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  27. Great tour of the national park. Wonderful rock formations.

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    1. Thanks Rajesh, it really is an amazing, desolate, and beautiful place.

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  28. More and more I've come to appreciate the rugged beauty of the desert. Your photos help!!!

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    1. Happy to be of service Kathy! I've appreciated those things since I was but a wee lad...

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  29. I've never seen a bad shot of this park! What wonderful formations and textures and shapes. Your photos are outstanding.

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    1. There are photo-ops galore there, but the light can be extremely harsh at times. Thanks Betty!

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  30. I did see Peters post and emediately thought of it when I read your headline :) You guys share so many gorgeous places I would never see otherwise. Thanks Pat. :)

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    1. Thanks, and your are welcome! Pete is a good guy, and we both share a love for this place. He and I hope to out there together pretty soon.

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  31. I'm sorry that I have not been around much lately, but once in a while I'm been in the mood for blogging. However, I see that I have lost a lot. Once again I can see that nature is the foremost artist. Even Henry Moore might have learned something here.

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    1. No problem Rune! I completely agree with you about nature being the foremost artist. Thanks for stopping by...

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  32. A fascinating landscape! The rounded rocks almost look alive...

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    1. Thank you Villrose, for taking the time to stop by comment.

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  33. I can see why you love that first photo. I do, too. Was the area once under water? Part of the Great Basin? The interesting rock formations suggest it.

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    1. Thanks Mary! The area was once under the ocean, but most of the erosion took place underground. Joshua Tree NP, is not in the Great Basin. Part of it is in the Mojave desert (that borders the Great Basin), and part is in the Colorado desert. Actually, the Colorado desert, is part of the larger Sonoran desert. That was a good question though, the Great Basin is HUGE. Almost the entire state of Nevada, a portions of Oregon, Idaho, California, and Utah.

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  34. Pat, you are a very interesting researcher and a photographer also. If I would be in the places like this one I would not even know how to photograph these rocks. You know how to do it. You see them in your special way. Sometimes I think that all these rocks, your findings, plants and a "bear" ( forth picture from the bottom ) speak to you.

    You rocks are wonderful creatures!!! Your photographs are great!!!

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    1. Thanks Kaya! I enjoy the research almost as much as being actually out there. In reality, it's not the easiest environment to photograph in. The sun can be so brutal, that it washes everything out. Also, there is so much wherever you look, that cropping is usually needed. Unless, of course you are looking for a large scene. I did about 5 different crops on the original first photo, and I liked them all. I really don't think I'm that good of a technical photographer, but I think I have a good eye for what will look good. You, on the other hand are a great photographer. One of my favorites!

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  35. Wonderful - every time I see one of your posts like this, I can't help but think that you would love central Australia (assuming you were able to get away from the hot spots I think). Let me know if you plan to visit!!

    Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

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    1. I would love to go there Stewart! I would certainly look you up. This would take some planning though, because I think I'd need at least a few months to even scratch the surface of your great country.

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  36. On photos there is something romantic about the desert, roaming around freely ...if you know your way around! And if you love to discover things of the past. So, how do YOU keep track of where you are?
    Many thanks for sharing the rock-people you saw in this desert with All Seasons! Have a (good)rocky week:)

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    1. I agree! Roaming around freely is romantic! I don't get because my granny "lost proof" me as a kid. It's a combination of things. Sorry for the cop-out answer, but if I said it all, the answer would be longer than this post!

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  37. Is that a new header? Well, it's cool. I never get tired of all the swirling rocks and big boulders. It's like God's pool table out there. Or Fred Flintstones. Great photos.

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    1. It is a new header, and I'm actually in it also. God's (or Fred Flintstones) pool table. That is too funny! Thanks Sharon!

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  38. You always take such beautiful pictures! I love the first one especially, there is just something about it. Plus it's black and white, I do love black and white photography.

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    1. Thanks so much Amanda! I'm right there with you on the first photo. I'll in that exact same area tomorrow.

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  39. Hi Pat, Wow, excellent photography here! I have to agree with you ... love the first one ... "Take a bite!" And yes, I see the bear too! :-) This is truly an impressive post ... the presentation is superior. Thanks for sharing your work! John

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  40. Hi John! Thanks for all the nice words. I was out on that same area two days ago with a friend. It is an amazing place. Thanks again!

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  41. Sorry for neglecting your post, Pat. Been a bit under the weather.
    Read about the DI Gunny who was convicted, don't remember which base it was, San Diego maybe, of abuse of recruits. How time changes, eh? Pretty much the same shit they did you, except you weren't Muslim.
    My son Henry told me they have a slightly different methodology now in Ranger school, they us sleep and food deprivation, stuff like that.
    Hope you're well, pal.

    Mike

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    1. Sorry you've not been feeling well Mike. I hope it passes soon. Oh yeah, the Drill Instructors will always adapt and find new methods of torture. The latest Marine boot camp torture is called "The Crucible." Like the Ranger school, it's all about deprivation. I am doing well Mike. I've been out in the desert doing what I love. Take care my friend...

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