Monday, February 19, 2018

Twin Tanks #3 Wilderness Area Pictographs & Rock Shelter JTNP

The third of four posts from the Twin Tanks area of Joshua Tree National Park. I use the term "Twin Tanks area" loosely because it's closer to it than anything else, but it's not really close at all. If you are thinking about trying to find these two sites, please remember that the first few photos may, or  may not even be in the area at all. It is also very easy to become hurt, or lost there.







Pictograph Site
The "cave" in that huge boulder looks pretty inviting!





Can you spot the pictographs in this photo?

The same photo after some post processing. This isn't a large or amazing site, and it is extremely obscure. I'm sure there are very few people who have seen it since it's creation. If anybody does stumble upon it, I doubt if they would see anything at all.


Nothing at all in this photo, right?


It wasn't easy to coax these two guys out of the first photo. It looks like two people to me. You can still see the outstretched arms, head, and body of the one on the left. I might be wrong about the one on the right, it may be just a smudge! Heck, I may be wrong about the one on the left also...


Rock Shelter






There were small pottery shards nearby, and also evidence (almost invisible) of pictographs in this rock shelter. Even after using DStretch on them there were only a few faint lines. Because of that I didn't include any photos. 







.

41 comments:

  1. That second cave definitely looks like someone could have lived there for a time.

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    1. I agree Alex! Plenty of room in there. When I stick my head in these things, I always wonder if there will be a mountain lion looking back at me.

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  2. you really make me want to hike with you

    :)

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    1. Thanks Mac! If you are ever in the area that can certainly happen.

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  3. Such an interesting place Pat, you found a goodie!

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  4. It's fascinating how you were able to to "see' the pictographs pre editing, Pat! Good eyes! There are many red rock cave formations along Colorado's front range and archaeologists have found evidence that people used them for shelter as far as 11,000 years ago, if not longer!

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    1. Thanks Pat! One of these days, I hope to see that area.

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  5. Very beautiful and interesting. Better you exploring this area than me!

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    1. I agree Al, it is beautiful and very interesting. I love exploring areas like this.

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  6. I always enjoy your pictures Pat, I could see the pictographs but your enhancements just confirmed what I was seeing, Thank you Sir things like this are like you said easily missed by the majority of people who happen to stumble across them.

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    1. Thanks Jimmy! Not only was this place hard to find, there are very few people who ever even go there to stumble...

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  7. Interesting rock shapes and formations.

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  8. I am amazed at how many sites there actually are with pictographs! Of course, I may miss them as you said, if they're well worn. Do you find them primarily in desert areas?

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    1. Hi Kathy! Yes, primarily in the desert areas because I love being in the desert. There are also a lot of pictographs along the central coast and inland from there also.

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    1. I totally agree William. Magnificent, barren, and beautiful.

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  10. Great pictures, Pat. I'll be back to commenting more once I shake this flu. Sucker really jumped on me.

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    1. Thanks Mike! My wife caught it and she was feeling bad for 3 weeks! I hope you feel better soon. I've managed to dodge it so far.

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  11. Gorgeous photographs, Pat! I especially love the black and whites. There is something about black and white images that adds a dramatic feel.

    The pictographs are fascinating.

    The shape of these rocks remind me of a manatee.

    Enjoyed this post, my friend!

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    1. Thanks so much Ron! I'm glad you liked it. I agree with you about b&w.

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  12. A treasured landscape! Beautiful photos as always, Pat.
    Thanks for taking us along.

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  13. A great find and wonderful photos for us to enjoy with you. Thanks!

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    1. You are most welcome Jeff. I'll be over as soon as I can to check out your trip.

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  14. I like that second black and white. Awesome. Make a good blowup.
    Imagine the life lived there. Very hard to do. But it was there. Amazing.
    Well done on your trained eye picking out those gems. How wonderful Pat.

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    1. Thanks Anthony! Yep, life was very hard there, but they did just fine until we showed up...

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  15. The rock formations and the desert geography is so foreign to me, I'm used to green fields and trees, or in winter, the landscape covered with glistening white snow. It's amazing that people actually thrived in the desert. What did they eat?
    How did they cook? It must have been a very hard life. Why didn't they just go somewhere where the living was easier?
    You said you are always on the lookout for a mountain lion..... have you ever encountered one? And what would you do if you came face to face with one?

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    1. Hi Sham! Most of the Indians who lived in the southwest actually had two seasonal habitation areas. During the hot season they lived in the mountains, or by the coast (if one was available). They ate game, seeds, acorns, and other plants. During the winter they migrated down to their desert home. While there they ate lost of agave and other plants, mountain sheep, and small game. The ones that went to the coast, ate fish and a LOT of shellfish. They cooked over campfires, or in roasting pits.

      I have seen a few glimpses of them over the years, but usually didn't feel threatened. A while back a friend of mine (Pete, who comments here) and I found a mostly eaten mountain sheep carcass. We were very close to it, and then realized that we were in a mountain lion's lair! Needless to say, we exited in a hurry. When we aren't out and about, my wife and I live very close to the coast in southern California. There are many more mountain lion activities, and even attacks there. Usually joggers, or mountain bike riders. If I came face to face with one, I'd probably try to take a photo of it. A couple of years ago, I was hiking by myself in the mountains. The trail was kind of muddy. When I returned via the same trail, there were mountain lion tracks on it. I'm pretty sure he was following me.

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    2. Hi Sham! Your comment is right here. I wonder why you can't see it.

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  16. Congratulations on another amazing find -- and huge thanks for sharing. I don't think you're at all wrong on those outstretched arms pictos. They look exactly like what you said. I'm sure its smart to disguise the exact location ... not everyone is worthy of seeing these treasures. (You could, of course, give me the exact GPS coordinates and a magic carpet and I still couldn't find my way.... which is another reason why I am so grateful to you for sharing these hidden treasures.

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    1. Sallie - Sharing these places is always my pleasure! I'm glad you saw the arms also. You are right about it being much more than just coordinates. Have a nice weekend...

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  17. I definitely see people in that one you "coaxed" out. :) Looks almost like the guy on the left is jumping off something. Love seeing your JT pics as always. Don't get lost or hurt though.

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    1. Hey there VEG! I'm glad a couple of people agree with about that that guy. I think I'm pretty much lost proof, but getting hurt is another matter. Thanks!

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  18. Hi Pat. Great post! I've hike Twin Tanks three times now (once with you!) and I still feel like I've barely scratched the surface of what is to be seen in the area. Both the "cave" and the rock shelter are awesome finds, and you're a master at coaxing out pictographs and petroglyphs! Very much looking forward to post #4, and also our next hike!!

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  19. Thanks so much Pete! I agree with you about this area. I also really want to go with you to the area you've posted about recently. Also Split Rock, and back to Twin Tanks.

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  20. Hello, what an awesome place to hike. The rock formation and cave are wonderful. Great series of photos. Enjoy your day!

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    1. Thanks Eileen! It is one of favorites places.

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