Monday, April 30, 2018

Rocky Point Petroglyph Site - Gila River Area AZ

Rocky Point is another great site along the Gila River. Background info relating to this site, is pretty much the same as my recent post on the Painted Rock site. For thousands of years people have been using the areas around the Gila as an ancient "freeway." While doing so they left a great deal of evidence of their presence.  This site contains petroglyphs, pottery shards, rock alignments, ancient trails, etc. There is also some historic graffiti here.

This photo and the next are in the general area, but may or may not be near the actual site.


 Most certainly a very barren and unforgiving area. 

If you look just left of  center in this photo, you can see a horizontal line of rocks. 

This is the same line, only with the photo taken from above. If you saw it in person it is recognizable as a man made stone wall. Maybe it was defensive in nature, or maybe not...








 The bare line leading away from this is an ancient trail. There is also at least one going up the hill.

 Nature always finds a way.

No idea who left this, but has clearly been here a long time. 

A pretty large pottery shard. There were quite a few of them. (Yes, I replaced it exactly where I found it).



We are spending the next few weeks in Nevada, and Southern Utah, and have already seen some amazing things.

67 comments:

  1. Almost like looking at the moon. Except for that very determined cactus.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sometimes it seems as desolate as the moon. You are right about that cactus Alex. Nature always finds a way.

      Delete
  2. I look at the remains of that volcanic flow and try to imagine the forces of nature that cracked it into those relatively similar-sized chunks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know what you mean Mac. It also me that all of this was ocean at one time.

      Delete
  3. Unforgiving but beautiful terrain. You would not want to twist an ankle out there.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I liked the cactus too and it looks like an interesting place!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Brian! It's totally interesting. There are thousands of years of history there.

      Delete
  5. Hi Pat. Looks like a fascinating area. It strikes me that the rocks, with their dark patina and lighter color underneath, would have been perfect for inscripting symbols and messages (and even more recent graffiti). That large pottery shard is a great find!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are so right about the dark rocks Pete. They really do make a lot of contrast. Also, the age of the petroglyph can be be determined (not exact) relative to how much patina has reformed on the lighter marks. I don't know the specifics, but I do know that it's very technical.

      Delete
  6. That is truly 'out of this world', Pat.... Talk about desolate.... Mercy Me!!!! Anxious to hear about what all you did in southern Utah. We were there last Sept ---and loved that area.

    Hugs,
    Betsy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Betsy, hope you are doing well. We had a blast in Utah, we also spent some time in Nevada and saw some amazing things there as well.

      Delete
  7. It looks like another beautiful desert area. I'm looking forward to seeing your Nevada/Utah shots!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree with you Tom. Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately) most people don't agree. We're on our home and spending a couple of nights near Las Vegas, I'm going through my photos. I think I took about 1900! I'd like to cut them in half the first time through. We saw, hiked in, and explored so many beautiful places.

      Delete
  8. ...what a nice homey spot.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh yeah Tom! Don't you just want to jump in the middle of those rocks? They look so warm and cuddly.

      Delete
  9. Thanks for the "tour" and photographs. Very haunting landscapes!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are most welcome Elizabeth. Thanks to you for being here.

      Delete
  10. There is interest and history and an odd sort of beauty in places many of us wouldn't even think to really look! Thank you for the reminder ... and for the climbs and hikes with your camera in hand! looking forward to more pictures from your travels.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Believe me Sallie, it's all my pleasure! I'll keep doing it for as long as I can.

      Delete
  11. The desert has so many secrets that we want to seek answers. It is so desolate out there yet so pretty and inviting. The photos show us its beauty. Looking forward to seeing your Nevada and Utah photos.
    Thank you Pat

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are welcome Bill, and thanks to you also. Unfortunately, most people totally miss out on that beauty because they won't go anywhere near the desert.

      Delete
  12. Where you are standing the path looks pretty wide ...enough for a car? - can't believe it's so flat (much flatter than the road I live on!) Yes it does look bare, but still you found signs of people having passed by there! Many thanks for sharing tfis intriguing area with All Seasons! Have fun -all of you-on your trip1 Can't wait so see N. Utah (we were in the South).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jeannette! Is was wide enough for a car, but there is no way a car could get to that spot. If you saw it in person you would see that it's really just a clearing, and very short. The trail though, trailed away into the distance.

      Delete
  13. Did my comment get through? thanks for showing this intriguing area to All Seasons! Is the path wide enough for a car? Have fun exploring the next few weeks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes it did! My pleasure Jeanette. We are having fun. Not much today though. On and off thunderstorms and HEAVY rain all day.

      Delete
  14. Pat, I always love all your photographs, but the first picture (the black and white one) literally made me go, "WOW!" That is such an exquisite shot! For some reason, it reminds me of one of my favorite Alfred Hitchcock films, "The Birds." I love the telephone poles and wires because you don't see those much anymore.

    "Nature always finds a way."

    Yes, doesn't it blow you away how nature ALWAYS finds a way? I always think that when I notice a sprig of green grass growing through a crack on the pavement in New York City. Regardless, nature finds a way.

    These petroglyphs are so fascinating!

    Thanks so much for sharing your adventures. I really enjoy them!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much for the nice words Ron. I really do appreciate them. Yep, nature ALWAYS finds a way. Sharing this stuff is my pleasure. I'm glad you like it.

      Delete
  15. Very special images, you choose a lovely settings.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Bob! I can only imagine how it was when there was a river there.

      Delete
  16. Cactuses are such unrelenting self-resilient plants! Reminds me of suculents that sometimes grow on roof tiles where there isn't a drop of water just scorching sun.....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are so right DEZMOND! They will also punish you at any given opportunity. I know what you mean about succulents. If you take a single leaf off of one, and then just toss it on the ground (even cement), it will grow right there. Not all of them do that, but many do.

      Delete
  17. It is such a remarkable landscape, and you captured it beautifully Pat. Amazing to realise its long history.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Marleen! The long history of these places is part of what draws me to them.

      Delete
  18. Very cool carvings and such amazing, otherworldly scenery.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I love your could be, might be, vague description of where the sites you find are Pat. I don't blame you, I would be the same. Especially the way some people have no qualms about rubbishing these special places. Lots of fascinating details here. Enjoy your time away ✨

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Grace! If they are public sites, I figure people can find them on their own. Sites like this one is when I get really evasive. Some of the sites I post about could be made at least semi-public. Physical barriers, education, VERY heavy penalties for vandalism, site stewards, etc. All of those things would help. When various gov. agencies pretend these places don't exist and try to keep the secret, some people (vandals) seem to take that as a challenge.

      Delete
  20. Wonderful observations Pat. And I'm glad you keep the locations obscure. Some assholes around.
    I wonder what the wall was for...Some sort of religious significance? Think of the effort to get those rocks there. Quite significant.
    Thanks for showing us these incredible places.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Anthony! Unfortunately, there are too many of those AH's out there. The rock wall could have been defensive in nature, religious, directional, astronomical, etc. Because there isn't always an easy answer to that question, these things are usually referred to as "rock alignments."

      Delete
  21. interesting place. Thanks for sharing :)

    ReplyDelete
  22. Great post (as ever) - but I really liked that first image, its so stark.

    cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

    ReplyDelete
  23. That cactus pic, "interesting" doesn't say it. But nature always finds a way - great caption for it, Pat.
    Keep discovering and enjoying the journeys.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Love that cactus photo. Perseverance furthers!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Robin! It looked even better in person.

      Delete
  25. Cool pics, and yes, very barren! I can't imagine spending much time in such a place.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! Actually, there is a lot going on there.

      Delete
  26. The rocks are very angular with what looks like sharp edges. Don't they get smoothed out by the desert winds? And where did the ancient people get the clay to make their pottery? Does it occur in the area where you found the pottery shard?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yep, the rocks are very angular. This type of rock doesn't erode quickly above ground. The ancient people here got their clay from all over, and this place is very close to the banks of a dry riverbed. The also traded for pottery, so no telling where it came from. Thanks for the questions!

      Delete
    2. Shammickite - I forgot to mention that the rock are black because of the formation of "desert varnish" on them. The Indians took advantage of that fact and scratched, pecked, etc through the dark coating, exposing the lighter actual surface of the rock.

      Delete
  27. Graffiti tends to have a negative connotation, as does just leaving your trash lying around. But from a historical perspective, both are a window into understanding the lives of those in the past ... Not that I recommend throwing your Coke can into the middle of the desert!!! Thanks for this very interesting perspective!

    ReplyDelete
  28. Thanks for the comment Angie! I totally agree with your thoughts. I'm not sure where the line (date) should bee drawn though.

    ReplyDelete
  29. Hi Pat, Wonderful and fascinating photos. I could sit here for a long time wondering what life was like in the times when people drew on rocks to communicate. An overused word, but truth: amazing. Thanks for sharing your blog and for your kind comments on mine. John

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks John! I do that exact thing. I usually end up thinking that the Indians did just fine until we showed and killed most of them. You are most welcome for the comments, and right back at you.

      Delete
  30. Excellent post! I love the determined cactus!

    ReplyDelete
  31. Well that is some rock wall. Loved the cactus.

    ReplyDelete
  32. It is a desolate area. Right up your alley! That cactus is very determined. I'll look forward to your Utah posts. We're going to Utah in a month. I can't wait. We'll be around the Moab area, for the most part. And Tory.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very desolate Sharon. Have a good time Utah. Moab is amazing!

      Delete
  33. You have no idea how much I envy you Pat. I worked in deserts in my youth, and I always loved the landforms you find in such environments. Still, at least I get to see the work of someone who is what I would call "a real desert person". Thanks Pat.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Thanks so much Dennis! Here we refer to them as "desert rats." I take after my granny.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Great finds and photos. It is interesting seeing the stone wall, historic graffiti and the cactus growing from the rock. The pottery shard is cool too. Thanks for sharing. Have a happy day!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Eileen! I can explore places like this all day.

      Delete

This blog is word verification free.
IS YOURS?
I love your comments and will do my best to respond to each and every one.