Monday, July 2, 2018

Bernasconi Pass Petroglyph and Luiseno Creation Story

This very interesting petroglyph sits in Bernasconi Pass in Riverside County. It has not been dated, but Indians have been in this area for thousands of years.  Luiseno creation lore says that the symbols on this rock represents Tukmit (the first man) and Tomayowit (the first woman). When the hollow part on top of the rock fills with water, it flows from one depression into another representing the male, and then into the lower representing the female. Then it flows through the female symbol to the ground. This is how the people, the land, the plants, and animals were created. 

Following creation, their first born children were sent to the four corners of the of the earth. Tomayowit lay down and become the Earth Mother. Tukmit rose above it all to become Father Sky. 


Although information relating to most petroglyphs no longer exits, it is fantastic that we still have sites like this one. This spot is included in a no trespassing zone adjacent to a dam, and I was fortunate to be allowed to see it. The stone was moved down the pass to this spot about 60 years ago to save it from seemingly ever present bulldozers.

The back side gives no clues. 

 A view of the symbols.

 I used DStretch only to highlight the symbols. You can more clearly see the path of the water passing from the male through the female symbol (yoni).


A little scenery

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There may or may not have been more petroglyphs further up the pass. If there was, they might have been destroyed when the road and dam were built. 



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62 comments:

  1. Amazing they still know the full story of that rock. Too bad they can't preserve it just a little more - put it someplace under cover or something.

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    1. I'm with you Alex. Why not put a fence around it and let everyone get close to it.

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  2. Such visual special effects, Pat! I'm shocked WETA hasn't hired you yet :PPP

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    1. Thanks DEZMOND! If WETA is like PETA they probably wouldn't.

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  3. ...thanks Pat for sharing this bit of history.

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  4. Well those are pretty darn amazing. Too bad the construction might have taken some out.

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    1. I agree Brian. Unfortunately, if most developers were left to their own devices, they would bulldoze it all.

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    1. My pleasure! Thanks for the comment Cloudia.

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  6. A little early man graffiti for the soul

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  7. What an intriguing place.

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    1. I agree Al. It's nice to still see some of it around.

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  8. Hi Pat. Fascinating story! If I came across this rock on a hike, I'm not sure I would recognize it as a petroglyph. It's like nothing I've ever seen before. Very cool!

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    1. Hi Pete! I think you would recognize it. You are very good at hunting around. Look at the cool things and places you've found lately!

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  9. Progress????? I have a love/hate relationship with it. I hate that some of the petroglyphs were lost in the building of the road and dam. In our area, so many homes are being built in our beautiful wooded areas. The poor deer and critters are losing their homes to this 'progress'..... Grrrrrrr.

    Hugs,
    Betsy

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    1. I'm right there with you Betsy! Also, whenever man and nature mix, natures suffers for it.

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    1. Thanks William! There is so much Indian lore out there to read about. What is really interesting is that some of the ancient stories are similar, even if the tribes are thousands of miles apart.

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  12. That back side does look like an upside back side!
    Great shots yet again Pat. Except this time, there's actual green grass!
    Was there rain recently?
    Love a good yoni. Very interesting. Thanks for the story.
    How to make the indentations! Not easy I imagine.
    Cheers for sharing Patty. :)

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  13. Thanks Anthony! I hadn't thought about it, but you are right to be surprised. There is rarely any green grass in my photos.

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  14. Great story Pat, its a shame with bulldozer.

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    1. Thanks Bob! I really don't like developers because of what they do to these places.

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  15. The original inhabitants have so many awesome symbols the western world sadly has lost! Love your description of the significance. Even without the d-stretch one can easily see the markings - many thanks from All Seasons, and have great fun exploring this week! I'll email in case my comment does not come through!

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    1. Thanks Jesh! We have lost a lot, but there are still plenty out there that haven't been discovered yet!

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  16. ". When the hollow part on top of the rock fills with water, it flows from one depression into another representing the male, and then into the lower representing the female. Then it flows through the female symbol to the ground. This is how the people, the land, the plants, and animals were created. "

    Pat, that was SO interesting to read! I love hearing stuff like that!

    As always, fantastic photographs! Beautiful area you live!

    P.S. Love your new blog header!

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    1. Thanks so much Ron! I tried not to be too graphic in the way I described it.
      I also find the history of these sites to extremely interesting. Thanks about the header photo. My friend Pete took that shot in Joshua Tree while we were out exploring.

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  17. Thank you for sharing this great story and photos Patrick

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  18. Things like this capture my imagination and I would love to know the stories behind them. What a great find. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. My pleasure Betty! I feel the same way about them. Maybe if we hadn't annihilated most of indigenous people as we made our way from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific, we'd probably know a great deal more.

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  19. This is all amazing! I love learning the Luiseno creation story; and I love that you got to go and see it and shared it with us. Many thanks.

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    1. Hi Sallie! Believe me, all of it was my pleasure. Thanks so much for looking at so many of my posts over the years. I truly do appreciate it.

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    2. you are welcome! And I always appreciate your visits and comments on mine! Had to laugh at you saying you spent some time in Eugene years ago when your VW bus broke down here; even today that bus would make you eligible for honorary citizenship in our 'small 'metropolis"... we still haven't entirely left the 60s-70s.

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  20. Hello Pat! Amazing place there, I enjoyed a lot these pictures and it's really interesting to learn about the symbology and story of the stones.
    I hope to have the opportunity to visit there someday.
    All the best for you and your family,
    Léia

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    1. Hi Leia! It's always nice to see your comment. I'm glad you enjoy these things. If you ever do visit, there is so much to see. Thanks so much and all the best to you also.

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  21. Those rocks have interesting shapes too, and they're stand-alone. I wouldn't expect that kind of green grass growing around them. (Sorry if I've put a song in your head). Thank you for taking us on another fun excursion, Pat.
    Be well.

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    1. That is funny Robyn. Before I could even get from the words to your apology, the song was already in my head. I don't even like that song! Thanks! You also be well.

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  22. Thanks for an interesting post, Pat. It's wonderful that you were allowed to see it.
    Re: your question on my blog regarding the creek, yes I'm sure little fish are swimming there.
    Enjoy your weekend!

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    1. Thanks Marleen! Yes, I was happy to see it. Thanks for the answer. I was wondering because it looks like the crops go almost all the way to the edge. I'm sure that there are places to fish everywhere there.

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  23. Enjoyed the Luiseno creation story very much Pat. I can tell how much you enjoy exploring these desert areas and really glad to be able to explore with you through your eyes and lens, merci beaucoup and happy weekend ✨

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    1. Thank so much Grace, I really appreciate what you said. I think maybe the best thing about blogs is our ability to learn about a place without ever going there. I am having a nice weekend so far, and hope that you are doing the same.

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  24. Amazing rocks tell amazing stories if we can understand them. Thanks for sharing, Pat.

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    1. You are right about that Bill. It kind of pains me to think how much of their stories and history has been lost. Sharing is my pleasure! Thanks for coming here, right back at ya!

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  25. Hello Pat,
    You found an amazing place and told us fascinating story of the stones. The photos are very interesting to study and look at.
    I was always inspired by your travels and adventures.
    I wish you all the best Pat!!!

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    1. Hi Kaya! I wish I had more stories to tell. We destroyed these people's lives, and much of the history is forever. Thanks so much for the nice words. I also wish you the best!

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  26. Hello, interesting story and symbol. I am not a fan of development, I think we have too much now. Happy Sunday, have a great new week ahead!

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    1. Thanks Eileen! I agree, we have way to much of it.

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  27. Pat - a fascinating petroglyph and creation story - love it!

    Thanks for recently visiting my blog - to answer your question - yes, we just moved into this house we built over the last year.

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    1. Thanks Angie, me too! Thanks for answering my question. It is beautiful!

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  28. I really enjoyed seeing the easy glpyh sites in Utah this summer. Of course, I thought of you and all your adventures. Carry on!

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    1. I totally agree Sharon. I really don't mind hunting rock art down, but it is also nice to be able to easily get to some. There are so many great sites in Utah!

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  29. Wow! That's quite a petroglyph story. Makes me wonder what others will find interesting about us and what we have left behind 10,000 years from now.

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    1. I also wonder that Robin. I'm wondering if we won't destroy ourselves before then.

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  30. You find such awesome places to visit. I really like the B/W photos. They're very artistic.

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