Monday, August 20, 2018

Bloomington Petroglyphs - St. George UT

No one really knows when people first arrived in this part of the country, but throughout the ages several groups have called it home. In order, the known groups are Early Hunter/Gatherers, Desert Archaic, Ancestral Puebloan (aka Anasazi), and Paiute. They have all left their marks here. Most of the petroglyphs shown below were thought to have been created by the Ancestral Puebloans as early as 2,000 years ago. As with most of these places, all of what I just said can't really be attributed to exact time periods.

These petroglyphs are located in a little neighborhood park, but it's really just a small area set aside to preserve them. In some of the photos you can see some of the houses. I'm happy to report that we saw very little vandalism.

I'm glad the site is somewhat protected, but was surprised that they would allow structures to be built so close to it at all. A while later I was REALLY surprised to learn that there are also petroglyphs boulders in people's back yards!  When I say surprised, I don't mean it in a good way. It makes me wonder how much history was bulldozed to "develop" this area. It didn't take long for me to find out that many things were destroyed. Have I ever mentioned that I really dislike developers? I'll jump off my soap box now. On with the petroglyphs!


The petros are on those large rocks in the middle of the park. The house to the right is currently for sale. I thought it would be cool to live right across the street. Then reality hit me. There is always some grizzly old guy in the neighborhood chasing kids off his lawn. That guy would most certainly be me. Of course there aren't any lawns here, so I'm sure I'd be obsessed with protecting the petros instead.


 It must have been quite a sight to see that large rock split in half.



 Based on the angle of the petros on the front rock, It must have split a very long time ago.


 It looks like there are at least two layers of petros in some spots.











 The presence of a grinding surfaces tells us that this area was also used for some type of habitation. Maybe a seasonal, or temporary camp, or maybe even a village. We will never know what else was in the area.




These little depressions are known as "cupules" and considered by many to be a very early form of petroglyphs. 


 Large spiral


 Graffiti mixed with some petros





Although we were just in this area a short while ago, I'm chomping on the bit to go back. There is much to see and do.

.

81 comments:

  1. Those are amazing Pat, no wonder you enjoy it there!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Reminds me of an amazing place close to my hometown (EP TX)...Hueco Tanks. Homes now butt up to the park. We used to go there often when I was a bitty kid...didn't appreciate half as much probably as when I was an adult and took my youngones. But I understand the park has been heavily vandalized and is now closed to the public except for small guided tours. What a shame there is so little respect.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Mac! I know about Hueco Tanks, but have never been there. There are things that can be done to limit vandalism in these places. So far, the agencies in charge don't seem to want to do them. It's a pity that a site as famous as Hueco Tanks doesn't have any of them in place. It's easier to just shut them down. That doesn't work at all, in fact many times things get worse.

      Delete
  3. Some marvelous details to these ones.

    I have a very low opinion of developers too. My choice words for them would include a lot of swearing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi William! I'm right there with you. They are developing the hell out of my area, and I don't like it at all.

      Delete
  4. We've been through St. George a couple of times --going to Zion, etc... Beautiful drive from there to Zion. I had no idea that the petroglyphs were there --AND so close to those homes....????? I really have mixed feelings about that. I am glad they preserved some of the history ---but as you said, how much did they lose?????

    Hugs,
    Betsy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Betsy! Oh yeah, there are a lot of rock art sites in the area. I think St. George is growing too fast for their own good. I've got some stories about stuff that has been bulldozed there. Heck, I know about stuff very close to my house!

      Delete
  5. With more research and study some of these may reveal important information.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree Red! Unfortunately a lot of these places were surveyed and studied many decades ago.

      Delete
  6. I'm on break but always have to stop by to see your awesome photos.
    The rocks are in people's yards? You're right, I'm sure some were destroyed or buried as well. Sad.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for saying that Alex! I have another post coming relative to some petroglyphs that were destroyed because of a gas station and a road. They destroyed most of the site.

      Delete
  7. What an amazing thing in the middle of a neighborhood.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It sure is Al. It's both sad and cool at the same time.

      Delete
  8. Looking at your pictures makes me wonder who the people were who lived there. What a shame we'll never know!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is so true! I know one thing though. They were made of tougher stock than us.

      Delete
  9. Hello, it would nice living so close to the park and petroglyphs. It is sad to think of the developers destroying historical sites. Enjoy your day and week ahead!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Eileen! I agree, but not sure if you can have one without the other. You have a great week also.

      Delete
  10. Brilliant Photos There Pat!! Stoked About These Just Down The Road In St George UT. Enjoy The Rest Of Your Week.

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much for stopping by and leaving a comment. Lots of petroglyphs there, also dinosaur prints. Enjoy the rest of your week as well.

      Delete
  11. It is amazing to think of how old those petroglyphs are! It is sad this area could not be preserved from development--we see much of that going on here too.
    In our area along the hogback area of the front range of Colorado there have been evidence of human life from as long as 11,000 to 13,000 years ago!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Pat! I really want to spend some more time in Colorado, you guys have some amazing stuff there. This time doing what I want to do! I wonder how many rock art sites have been destroyed because of so called progress?

      Delete
    2. So true, Pat. Civilization is really taking over here along the front range of Colorado and I'm sure much is being lost.

      Delete
  12. It must break your heart Pat to think how much could have been destroyed here. I'm with you on developers by the way, although they're called "cowboy builders" where I come from.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It does break my heart Dennis. "Cowboy Builders!" That's a great name for them. I also hate the developers who want to tear down historic buildings to build new ones. It's like history means nothing to them.

      Delete
  13. Those are amazing photos Pat. It makes you think about how long they have been there. They are priceless and should not be overlooked by any developer but unfortunately money seems to always get in the way. :(

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much Bill! When I'm at these sites, I'm always thinking about the ancient people. Money is always the most important consideration to those developer bandits.

      Delete
  14. There are layers of petroglyphs? That would burn me too and I'd be right there with you telling the kids to get off the rocks. Did something like that tonight, hanging off the beautiful weeping willow outside my porch, little monkeys. I'm turning into the guy from Trailer Park Boys who yells, "Shut up!" out of his trailer at the whole park. Lots of great photos, the colors are so rich and the whole petroglyph thing is so interesting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Jeanna! The neighbors would hate me from day one if I lived there.
      About the layers of petros. The first layer might be a thousand years older than the second layer that may only by hundreds of years old. Crazy, right?

      Delete
  15. Oh wow what an amazing discovery Pat.. I must admit I couldn't believe it when I saw the houses so close around, not at all like your usual hunting grounds. I really hope the petros are protected here, they look so vulnerable don't they 😱

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Grace! You are right, places like this are not my usual spots. In this case, I heard about this "park" and had to check it out. I know of plenty of other places where there are sites within various city limits, but those are usually surrounded by fences, or some other protective measure. These petros aren't really protected at all. I was very surprised that they haven't been trashed. I have to say though, there is VERY little graffiti to be seen in and around St. George.

      Delete
  16. Wow! Those are spectacular. I am blown away that houses were built there and absolutely infuriated to know that petroglyphs were destroyed. I will never understand the utter stupidity of our fellow humans.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Robin! I agree, it is a weird thing. I will also never understand. I'm sure we both know that it is all about money! That is all that matters to many folks.

      Delete
  17. WOW!! What a special and magical place! I wish I could visit it too! I love the vibes at such locations.
    Many thanks for sharing your impressive photos with us!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Isabella! I agree about the vibes at these places.

      Delete
  18. Developers are the same everywhere, no respect for history no matter how old or young it is. The same happens here when new subdivisions are planned.... historic houses mysteriously catch fire, nobody knows how.
    Lots of different styles of art in all those petroglyphs, must have been a lot of aspiring artists in those ancient tribes. About 15 years ago I was in Alberquerque and went to see some petroglyphs in a park very close to a housing estate. I was terrified that I would come across a rattlesnake at any moment. Saw lots of interesting shapes carved onto the rocks.... I must go back to my photo albums of that trip and have another look.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are right about developers. There is so many underhanded illegal things that go on. There are so many "rock art" sites in NM. I would love to spend more time there someday. I'm always on the lookout for rattlesnakes. A couple of years ago my wife stepping off of a ledge, going down into a wash. She missed stepping directly on a rattlesnake by about 6 inches. She was wearing shorts and low top hiking shoe! She was very lucky not to be bitten. We had hiked about 7 miles to get to this place, and drove about 20 on really bad dirt road before the hike. If she would have been bitten, I'm not sure how it would have turned out. Plus not even a hint of cell phone reception out there. Whew!

      Delete
  19. We were at Pietras Marcadas in the Petroglyphs Park at Alberquerque, NM. Just looked it up.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know about this place but have never been there. The petroglyphs are amazing. It's in Petroglyph National Monument I think. I REALLY want to see this place.

      Delete
  20. Looks fascinating and other-worldly.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Simply amazing! I can see why you would want to go back.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks James! It might take a year to see everything I want to see in this area.

      Delete
  22. Beautiful images, I love the drawings on the boulders.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Bob! I feel the same way. Imagine for much work it would be to make them.

      Delete
  23. Just splendid! Thanks for sharing these

    ReplyDelete
  24. Hi Pat. It looks almost surreal to see houses right across the street from these petroglyphs. It does seem like a larger area should have been protected, especially if there are petroglyph boulders in peoples backyards!! Like you, I'm not a big fan of developers, especially when cool and interesting stuff gets destroyed! I like the diversity of petroglyphs here... cupules, spirals, animal and human shapes, even a grinding stone. Very cool!

    ReplyDelete
  25. Hey Pete! I can understand people having petroglyphs on their property, but in their yard? That's crazy! You and I have to hike miles to see things like this, and these folks just walk outside...

    ReplyDelete
  26. I've never been to UT. Thanks for the virtual tour. I like how orange those rocks are (a pretty shade of orange, not the ugly orange of the person in the White House).
    Be well, Pat.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My pleasure Robin! HA!
      The rocks seem to change color as the lighting changes.

      Delete
  27. What a wonderful blog about the rocks.
    The drawings on the rocks are very beautiful.
    Best regards, Irma

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Irma! Very beautiful and very old.
      Best to you also...

      Delete
  28. I think I saw Kermit the Frog on one of them :))

    ReplyDelete
  29. So the rock split and then they worked on them? Or the other way around?
    Must have been one hell of a split. I wonder if there was any one about when it happened...

    Can imagine people being attracted to this bold feature.
    Wonderful photos. Thanks for sharing these with us.

    Yes, I'd be chasing them damn kids off too. I'd have a shotgun and a rocking chair. In fact I yelled at some hoons going round and round a roundabout in a car today. shit... I've become that guy.. haha

    Great location. You must do an awful lot of driving. Cheers Pat.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Anthony! I believe the rock split first. I was also wondering if anybody was around. As sparsely populated as it was back then, I'd say no. Probably wrong though. Whenever I see an odd shaped boulder, or a large one sitting by itself. I always try to get to them (to take a look).

      Delete
    2. I almost forgot...
      I do a lot of driving, but the lion's share of it is in our RV. Then we park it somewhere and use it as a hotel. Then we go further in the jeep that tow behind the RV.

      Delete
  30. These are wonderful petros Pat -- and I think you'd make an exceptional neighbor if you had such treasures in your backyard ... you would I'm sure be able teach the youngsters and excite them about this amazing heritage instead of chasing them away. This reminds me of a place near Vernal that we stumbled on many years ago called the McConkie Ranch. It was privately owned by people who allwoed the public to look at the amazing petroglyphs on their property. . I wonder if it is still there. The ladies who owned the ranch were at least our age at the time so they'd be getting up there (aren't we all?)..... Our visit predated my blog, but I did an after-the-fact post about it ... it is an awful post, I hadn't yet figured out what I was doing, but it does give the info, if you want to look it up. I will try to post a link here, but if it doesn't work, you can do a search under my archives and categories for McConkie Ranch Utah. I would love for you to visit that place if it is still there. Unless you alreadyd have and I missed your post which would be way better than mine. http://travelingrainvilles.typepad.com/traveling_home/2008/02/rock-art2-mccon.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Sallie! I think there would be a lot less vandalism to these places if schools actually taught the importance of them to students. I'm familiar with the McConkie Ranch, but haven't been there yet. You wouldn't believe the length of the list of places I want to visit is. Thanks for the link!

      Delete
    2. I just got back from your post. Thanks for all the information you provided.

      Delete
    3. I wish we could visit again!!! Hope you get to. I DO believe your list is long. And thank you for sharing the places you check off.

      Delete
    4. My pleasure Sallie! Thanks right back at you for encouraging me over all these years

      Delete
  31. Wow that boulder is HUGE. It had so many petroglyphs on it. I wonder what these people were trying to say. - Those little dots (cupules) were rather interesting. - It might be neat to live there but then again having to deal with tourists, not so fun I would think. Great post.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Ida! Nobody knows exactly what it all means. Although, "rock art" is a general term for this stuff, it really isn't "art" and it all serves a purpose of some kind. It is a big boulder for sure. Much closer to where I live there is rock that is considered to be the largest (known) free standing boulder on earth.

      Delete
  32. That rock is filled to the brim. I wonder if any early Americans were irritated when someone else carved a swirl too close to their deer. And so on. We've already booked our Vegas, Grand Canyon, Zion and Bryce trip for next summer! I can't wait for more desert adventures. I haven't even posted all of Utah from this summer.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Sharon! The image of one of them becoming irritated at another for doing that made me smile. It sounds like you have a great trip planned for next summer. If you have enough time while in Vegas, or on your way through to Zion. Take some time to stop in Valley of Fire State Park. It is AMAZING! You might have been there already though.

      Delete
  33. Wow, you must have quite the collection of petroglyphs by now!

    Also, I already AM that crusty old man you mentioned and I'm not officially old yet. Or a man! :)

    It's amazing how much stuff we do sacrifice in the name of the expansion of humanity and urban sprawl. I really appreciate little things like people building houses around trees, etc, instead of just chopping them down. Too bad they don't do it for petroglyphs!

    Excellent post as always.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey VEG! Yep, I've been to a lot of rock art sites, but have MANY more on my list that I haven't seen yet, and hope to find more that aren't. I think I am "officially" old now. How to get much older also. Thanks so much for stopping by! It is always a pleasant surprise. Have a nice weekend!

      Delete
  34. Hey Pat! It's been a while. Glad we are both still kickin'. Your pictures are awesome as usual and a joy to look at. Hope you and the fam are doing well. My wife and I have done a fair amount of traveling since we have last been in contact. Honduras, Costa Rica, Maldives, Dubai, and Egypt in the last couple years have broadened our horizon. Egypt was extremely interesting and including a week aboard an Aggressor for a week of diving in the Red Sea the trip was phenomenal. We are headed to Cuba for 12 days during the first part of November. Anyway, I am seriously thinking of getting back to my long suspended blog after summer is over. Stay tuned...and take care my friend!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Chuck! It has been a quite a while. I've had some issue in the past few years, but lick you said, still kicking! We are doing pretty darn well. Wow! You two have really been getting around. Lots of scuba diving I'm sure. Hope you revive your blog. You've always been one of my favorites Chuck...

      Thanks for the nice words, and you also take care. Enjoy your travels...

      Delete
  35. Beautiful photographs, Pat!

    And I completely understand your feelings about disliking developers because even here in Northeast cities such as Philadelphia and New York, where there is so much stunning historical architecture, I've seen what developers can do to them in order to build high-rise apartment and office building. I will say though, Philadelphia is very protective over their history, so we still have a lot of the original architecture that has simply been restored.

    The petroglyphs in these photos are AMAZING! Thanks so much for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much Ron! Sharing is my pleasure, and I'm glad you enjoyed it.

      Out here, they'd rather bulldoze an old building than rehab them. I'm glad to hear that the city values what you have back there. Take care Ron...

      Delete
  36. Wonderful pictures - old and new. You may be interested in a book called The Edge of Memory byPatrick Nunn, which is about how some of the oral traditions of many first peoples are being found to have a good deal to say about the change of climate at the end of the last ice age. Its on my (rather too long) reading list!

    Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Stewart! The book sounds interesting and I think I'll try to find it. I know what you mean about a long reading list...

      Delete
  37. Magnifiques photos, superbe reportage, j'aime beaucoup!

    ReplyDelete
  38. I'm waiting for an account of your latest adventure.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there! It's been almost three months since I've posted. I have a lot to post though. In early September I totally ruptured the Achilles tendon on my left leg. It's been an ordeal and I'm told I'll be back to normal in about six months. Thanks so much for checking in. I really appreciate it...

      Delete
    2. Oh OW!!! that sounds like lots of pain and hobbling about with a walking stick. Just do whatever the docs and the physios tell you to do so you can get out and do more desert exploration and then tell us about it.

      Delete
    3. I shall do both of those things!

      Delete

This blog is word verification free.
IS YOURS?
I love your comments and will do my best to respond to each and every one.